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Telling others how to vote

Jon The Southern Baptist LogoEditor’s Note: The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of The Iowa Statesman.

 

By Jon the Southern Baptist
On the Front Lines of the Culture War

 

I’ve seen a lot of brothers and sisters in Christ do it lately, and I have a strong suspicion it will become more prevalent as we get closer to February. I’m sure you’ve seen it, too.

“I just don’t understand how any God-fearing Christian could vote for [fill in the candidate’s name].”

The alternative form looks like this:

“We need to unite behind [fill in the candidate’s name], he’s the best Christian in the field.”

Have we seriously devolved that far; that we’re going to play the game of Alinsky tactics with each other now? When did Christianity become about personality politics and groupthink? Is that how we convert the unchurched now; through peer pressure?

There is only one way to salvation — through a relationship with Christ — but would anyone suggest there’s only one way to achieve that relationship? If so, what’s the point of asking a new Christian about his testimony; wouldn’t they all be the same?

We know not every relationship with Christ is identical, because we all come to know Him in different ways, at different times in our life, and through widely varying personal experiences. The believer who came to know his Lord on Death Row has the same reward awaiting him as the 90-year-old woman who never jaywalked and gave her heart to Jesus at the age of 9.

Paul told us not to put obstacles in the path of those who are seeking the Lord. Why, then, should we do that with one another? Yes, the Bible tells us to vet those who wish to lead us, and it also tells us what to look for, but if you were truly honest with yourself, you would quickly realize every candidate — some way or another — is lacking.

None of them are perfect. All of them have flaws. Which flaws matter most is a decision each of us must make individually.

Personally, I think you could make a solid, Christ-centered argument for at least half of the Republican field right now. And, if you’ve already made up your mind, that’s great. Please be sure to encourage your fellow Christians to support that candidate.

Emphasis on “encourage.”

We all want to be on a winning team, but the really cool part about being a Christian is that we already know we’re on that team. So, if a God-fearing Christian believes in his heart and soul that the best candidate for President of the United States is Bobby Jindal, and that God is going to create a miracle come February, why on earth would you feign offense and tear him down?

How would it be any different if he inserted Rick Santorum, Mike Huckabee, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Ben Carson, Rand Paul, or even Donald Trump, instead?

God put the lump of grey matter between your ears for a reason. He expects you to use it. So, I’m not going to tell you whom to support in the presidential primary process. I will just leave you with this bit of advice:

“Continue earnestly in prayer, being vigilant in it with thanksgiving; meanwhile praying also for us, that God would open to us a door for the word, to speak the mystery of Christ, for which I am also in chains, that I may make it manifest, as I ought to speak. Walk in wisdom toward those who are outside, redeeming the time. Let your speech always be with grace, seasoned with salt, that you may know how you ought to answer each one.”

— Colossians 4:2-6

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Jonathan Montgomery Harrington is the pseudonym for the anonymous author of Jon the Southern Baptist, who is fighting on the front lines of the culture war on a daily basis. If you have a suggestion for his contributions to The Iowa Statesman, write to him at jonsouthernbaptist@outlook.com.